The 5 Hidden Expenses of Raising Triplets

Financing Triplets

If you have or are expecting triplets, you may have realized that triplets are indeed expensive compared with singletons or even twins. Triplets don’t have the advantage of passing down clothes or furniture from one child to the next since they need everything simultaneously. Beyond the obvious costs such as nursery furniture, clothes, bottles, and diapers, or additional medical and hospital cost associated with the triplet delivery and the extended hospitalisation, or a need to change or extend the family home or purchase a new car, there are some hidden expenses that you may want to consider when planning your budget for triplets.

1. Medications/Formula

Since triplets are often born premature, keep in mind that you triplets may need medications and special formula. Preemie formula is typically more expensive than regular formula, as well as extra bottles and teats. They also may need special diaper cream for extra sensitive skin.

2. Health Insurance & Care

Associated with the previous expense, your triplets may require extra trips to the doctor from illness and/or accidents. It is difficult to isolate one of your triplets if they become ill, so there’s always a chance that if one gets sick, they all become sick. Since it’s hardly possible to keep an eye on all of your triplets at once, they may hurt themselves, damage household items, or climb to unexpected places if they work together.

Additionally, fatigue and stress affecting mom and dad may precipitate illness or other health needs. You also may want to invest in preventative health care, such as an exercise regimen or equipment or special supplements or vitamins to support your immune system.

3. Personal Insurance

Some parents consider getting personal insurance policies in the event of loss of income, disability, or death of one or both parents. While not fun to think about, if the financial burden would be too heavy in any of these scenarios, it may be something to discuss with your partner.

4. Loss of Mother’s Income

While not an “expense” per se, it is certainly a huge factor if you were bringing in a significant income before going on maternity leave. Moms of triplets may need to take an extended leave, especially if you are restricted to bed rest prior to giving birth. It also may be more cost effective for you to stay home as opposed to paying a sitter or daycare for three infants.

In the case of an extended leave, you have to consider the loss of seniority, benefits, or the personal expense of re-education whenever you return to work.

5. Increase in Utility Bills

All those extra clothes, crib sheets, and blankets may cause an increase in your power or water bill from doing laundry. You also may be running extra cycles in your dishwasher for bottles. If you live somewhere with a cooler climate, your heating bill may increase from being home often and keeping your babies warm.

Conclusion

Some countries, like Australia, have a multiple birth allowance to financially assist families with multiples. In the United States, government financial, food, or childcare assistance varies by state. Check with your local authorities for more information.

Triplets may cost more than you thought, but there are also ways you can save money. Breastfeeding, cloth diapering, and meal prepping/freezing meals before you deliver can all be ways to add cushion to your budget. Educating yourself, effective planning, and communication with your partner can help to ease any worries you have about financing your triplets.


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